Eating and training for your body type

Eating and training for your body type

All of us respond to different training and nutrition methods in our own unique way. While this is influenced by a host of factors such as our gender, age, height, weight, genetics and exercise background, your body type will have a strong impact, too. The good news is that, regardless of what body type you possess, you will still be able to achieve your physical goals – provided you know how to maximise your genetics.

There are three widely acknowledged body types:

  • Ectomorph: An ectomorph tends to be “straight up and down” with narrow shoulders and hips. Just as they lack body fat, they also lack muscle. They tend to struggle to gain weight due to high metabolisms and are therefore commonly referred to as “hardgainers”.
  • Endomorph: An endomorph is essentially the opposite of an ectomorph, with more fat deposits but also more muscle mass. They have wider hips and shorter limbs than an ectomorph or even a mesomorph. They tend to struggle to lose weight due to slow metabolisms. The good news is that they can gain muscle easily, but it is often accompanied by fat gain. They have the greatest potential to build strength and size. Many powerlifters are endomorphs.
  • Mesomorph: A mesomorph generally looks the most proportioned, with a muscular frame and relatively low level of body fat. They can both gain muscle and lose fat fairly easily. This is the ideal body shape for bodybuilders.

You should modify both your training style and nutritional approach according to which body type you have. If you have characteristics of two categories, use a combination approach.

Workout-3-Body-Types

Source

Ectomorphs
Ideal training strategy
Many ectomorphs want to gain weight, which is possible with a low-intensity training regime and a big eating plan. Ectomorphs should train three to four days a week, and try to keep workouts to around 45 minutes. They should lift heavy weights in a lower rep range (sets of five for the main lifts and 6 to 10 reps for accessory exercises). As they are prone to overtraining, they should avoid supersets and circuits and ensure rest periods are at least 60 seconds. They should also avoid aerobic exercise where possible.

Ectomorphs should focus on the main lifts and avoid wasting energy on isolation exercises. Ectomorphs have good pound-for-pound strength and can master bodyweight exercises (dips, pull-ups, etc) quite easily. Due to their short torsos and long limbs, they also make good deadlifters.

Ideal nutritional strategy
Even though it can feel uncomfortable at times, ectomorphs must teach their bodies to eat more food if they want to gain muscle. If you think you’re eating enough but you’re still not gaining weight, you simply need to eat more (bigger portions as well as more frequently). Pounding fast food all day every day will certainly help you to gain weight, but it will not be the type of weight you want.

Ideally, an ectomorph should follow a diet that is up to 40 to 50 per cent carbs, with their remaining macros split equally between protein and fat. Carbohydrates can be eaten at every meal. If you are serious about gaining weight, you should eat 750 to 1000 calories above maintenance levels each day. Weight gainer shakes can help with those who are struggling to eat large amounts of food.

hardgainer

Source

Endomorphs
Ideal training strategy
The training style of an endomorph should be geared towards higher reps (eight to 15) with moderate weights and shorter rest periods (less than 60 seconds). This will encourage fat loss. It is extremely important that the endomorph engages in resistance training, as that is what will improve body composition and boost the metabolism.

Endormorphs actually tend to have a good existing layer of muscle, but it is sometimes covered with a layer of fat, and HIIT (two to three sessions a week, for 15 to 25 minutes) is ideal for shedding this fat while retaining muscle. Gentle aerobic exercise such as walking can be done at other times.

Ideal nutritional strategy
Endomorphs should aim to follow a healthy diet, avoiding large amounts of sugar, saturated fat and alcohol. Endomorphs should keep their total carb intake lower, to around 30 per cent (and generally limited to pre- and post-workout), with 40 per cent of their calories coming from protein and 30 per cent from fat. Consuming small protein-based meals more frequently can help with controlling blood sugar levels and preventing overeating.

Mesomorphs
Ideal training strategy
As their bodies are essentially designed for lifting with better recovery systems, mesomorphs can train more frequently and for longer periods of time. They will see best results from training with heavier weights (sets of five to 10 reps for the main lifts and six to 12 reps for accessory exercises). They should focus on the compound lifts while using accessory exercises to bring up lagging body parts. They typically respond well to a variety of training intensities and techniques, such as drop sets, rest-pause sets, forced reps and negatives.

Mesomorphs gain muscle quite easily. Those who have reached an ideal level of muscle mass can simply switch their training style to slightly higher reps (10 to 15) with more moderate weights to maintain their muscle mass. Aerobic exercise should be done a maximum of two to three times a week.

Ideal nutritional strategy
Of the three groups, mesomorphs have it easiest when it comes to nutrition. They will find that they can lose and gain weight quite easily with only mild changes to their nutrition plans. A macronutrient split of 40 per cent carbohydrates, 30 per cent protein and 30 per cent fat is ideal. To gain muscle, eat approximately 500 calories above maintenance levels. To lose fat, start with a deficit of 200 to 500 calories below maintenance.

Meals like this work well for mesomorphs.

Meals like this work well for mesomorphs.

Source

Do you already train in accordance with your body type? Is there anything you will do differently after reading this?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...